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20131202
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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
Al Jazeera America
Dec 8, 2013 11:00pm EST
grew up in a south africa divided by apartheid. >> the anc has two options, continue doing same, which is the political party it is now, or it can make itself into a party of the 21st century. so it has to think about the young voters, the people who were born after apartheid, born even in the 1990s who are now the youngest voters in south africa, those are the voters that it has to create a strategy for, the voters they have to convince to go to the polls and vote. >> this is a crossroads isn't it? >> yes, it is a crossroads, it cannot claim just to be the party that liberated south africa, it has to create more positive claims. >> it can't rely on nelson mandela and its history. >> right. but it's about the history of libertying south africa from white rule. it is a history that doesn't build houses. it is a history that builds clinics and makes schools run. they have to try to put in place the kind of civil service that delivers that. >> because searveg has a lot of -- searve south africa has af problems it is dealing with. how much of that should be blamed on the anc, the ruling pa
MSNBC
Dec 5, 2013 6:00pm PST
mandela was in his early 40s. he had joined the african national congress, the anc, way back in 1944. the anc and the other major organizations opposing apartheid in south africa had been organized as nonviolent movements, nonviolent resistance, and nonviolent organizing. but after sharpville, they decided that maybe that wasn't enough. after sharpville, they decided they would form a paramilitary wing, and nelson mandela was one of the anc leader who is went underground to help start it. they said they would target government buildings and strategic infrastructure and they would try to sabotage the state. after sharpville, the government of south africa started mass arrests of anc leaders and other activists. they banned the anc. they made it illegal to be a member of that group. nelson mandela was arrested for treason in 1961, he was acquitted and he was convicted of traveling illegally. they sentenced him to five years hard labor on south africa's version of alcatraz, which is robin island. while he was already serving that sentence, while he was already in prison, they put him on
MSNBC
Dec 5, 2013 9:00pm PST
early 40s. he had joined the african national congress, the anc, way back in 1944. the anc opposing apartheid had been organized as non-violent resistance. but after sharpville, they decided maybe that wasn't enough. after sharpville they decided they would form a paramilitary wing and nelson man delg la was one of the anc leaders who went undergroutd to help it. they would target infrastructure and try to sabotage the state. after sharpville the government of south africa started mass arrests of anc leaders and other activists. they banned the a nchnc. they made it illegal to be a part of that group. nelson mandela was arrested in 1961, again in 1962 and convicted of traveling illegally. they sentenced him to five years hard labor on robben island. while he was already serving that sentence they put him on trial again, this time for sabotage. and they convicted him, and they sentenced him to life in prison, to life on robben island. so in 1964 he began a new sentence that was a life sentence, and for the first 18 years of it his cell on robben island had no bid, no plumbing of any
MSNBC
Dec 7, 2013 5:00am PST
in the country. that's because he was a member of the anc the liberation movement that not apartheid in south africa for decades. movement that the white apartheid threw mandela in prison for being a part of, giving him a light sentence after releasing him after 27 years in captivity, even then, even in the summer of 1990, those first months after he had finally been let out of jail. even as south africa was finally starting to take those first frazzled steps away from apartheid in towards real genuine multi-racial draerks even then as nelson mandela was being hailed as a hero, all across the globe, the united states government officially considered him a member of a terrorist organization. they forced him to endure the endignitary of receiving a waiver of being told in effect, sure, come on in, we will give you some rewards, call you a hero. you are the revepgsception. the rest of the anc, we think they are terrorists. it wasn't until 2008 that congress passed and president george w. bush, not his father, it wasn't until five years ago the u.s. government got around to signing legislation th
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 5:00pm PST
. it caught fire. they began to educate and send their anc representatives out of the country and all over the world talking about what was going on. i introduced legislation in the california state assembly where i was serving to divest all of our pension funds from businesses that were doing business in south africa. that caught fire. and investment started all over the united states in various legislatures. the young people on the college campuses started to march and rally. transafrica forms and began to sit in at the south african embassy. we closed down the south african council here in los angeles, so the movement took hold. and we added to that the sanctions, the rallies, the protests, the education about what was going on, and it brought apartheid to an end. >> yeah, i think the key point if that is the grass-roots movement of divestment as the predicate to sanctions. it became the national government's policy version of what universities and cities and states and all sorts of cities were working on on a grass-roots level. i want to bring in thomas frank, author of "the wrecking c
NBC
Dec 6, 2013 4:00am PST
, defenseless people. >> reporter: the anc was banned. he became an outlaw, but he refused to back down. arrested in 1962 mandela was charged with sabotage and with attempting to violently overthrow the government. he was convicted and sentenced to life in prison. for decades the struggle for justice in south africa continued with the imprisoned nelson mandela as its symbol. at times he was forced to break rocks in the hot sun for hours at a time. the government offered mandela freedom if he would renounce violence. he refused. >> today marks the 25th year behind bars for nelson mandela. >> reporter: south africa became an international outcast, facing sanctions, boycotts, and growing political pressure. >> nelson mandela should be released to participate in the country's political process. ♪ >> reporter: rock concerts for the cause were broadcast around the world. ♪ hey, mandela >> the release of nelson mandela. >> reporter: in 1989 south africa's hardline president p.w.bota resigned, replaced by f.w. clark who slowly began to dismantle apartheid. the ban on the anc was lifted, and
NBC
Dec 5, 2013 6:00pm PST
especially to the generation that came up after his story was well known that his organization the anc was not a non-violent organization. it was rough and he surrounded himself with some rough people. >> right. he started out being non-violent. and when he realized that the anc wasn't getting anywhere close to its mission, the group of leaders of the anc decided we need to become a military organization. and he started spear of the nation which was the military wing of the anc. and he taught himself. he read generals. he read caesar. he learned that like he learned everything. and it went against his grain, but again, as i was saying before, he had one overarching goal. and whatever got to that goal, he would do. even embracing violence. as you showed earlier, he refused to not embrace violence to get out of prison. because he said i can't negotiate while i'm in prison. that was the leverage he had. and he understood that. >> when you're in south africa as you know better than most, you don't hear mandela as much as you hear madiba. and as i was saying to charlayne, it's parental, it'
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 10:00am PST
winnie mandela was, what was apartheid, what is anc, that is african national congress. it took years leading up to dive divestment. because i was fortunate enough to serve on the board of trans africa we were part of the strategy that not only did rallying and arrested at the embassy and took over the south african consulate in los angeles but economic sanctions were extremely important to put pressure on the south african government to help bring down the unconscionable apartheid. so it took work, hard work. >> there was a movement across the country as congressman mentioned on campuses everywhere. i was covering it. ron, you in congress with a number of leaders an then some republicans joining in to try to finally pass the legislation. you authored one piece of legislation. it was compromised and finally passed and overrode veto. jim baker said on "morning joe" today, this was a time when congress took on the foreign policy, first override of foreign policy veto of a president in that century. >> it really was. first let me say, i'm honored to be with my sister and friend maxine wa
Bloomberg
Dec 6, 2013 5:00pm EST
, which was always the goal of the anc. and whether one is from nigeria or tanzania or closer to home, mozambique, across africa people rallied behind the anc in that struggle. i think president mandela stood for freedom, and he now stands for integrity and perseverance. the continent needs to move towards that in terms of the next phase of the struggle, which is political freedom has been achieved now. economic freedom is necessary. >> speak a little about your own experience in relation to the perspective of nelson mandela, particularly when it comes to nonviolent protest, and in violence in africa, as well is the work you have done combating aids in africa. >> i really respect president mandela, again, because of his conviction. he was a person who started as he did, in terms of nonviolent struggle against apartheid regime, and at some point he realized the level of repression of the national party required a more robust response, which was moving towards arms struggle. leader likefound a erk who could negotiate with the national party that was now ready after the mass demonstratio
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 6:00am PST
. with him no longer as the spiritual leader of the anc. at least no longer on this earth. what is that going to do to politics going forward? >> when he walked away and said don't call me, i'll call you, he left politics. so for a number of years now, he has not been on the scene. i think to a certain extent, that's unfortunate. i think that this young democracy is having some missteps. >> it does feel that way. >> a few stumbles. it's difficult because mandela has not been there to way in. maybe at this moment when people are not on the streets, but contemplating what mandela stood for, they might come to a better moment than they are in currently. >> put into perspective, that was an amazing three or four-year period in history. when you look back, it's stunning and like how did we lose the momentum? we were almost there. >> it takes -- you did have prague and the berlin wall and the leaders who were able to have a vision. bush 41 had a vision in terms of german reunionification. there were leaders in different parts of the world. >> who seize the moment. >>a i new economic freedom was not
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 1:00am PST
killed 69 people. at the time, nelson mandella was in his early 40s. the anc and the other major organizations opposing apartheid has been nonviolent organizing. they decided maybe that wasn't enough and nelson mandella was one of the leaders who went underground to help start it. they would try to sabotage the state. they banned the amc. they made it illegal to be a member of that group. nelson mandella was arrested for treason in 1961. in 1962, he was convicted of traveling illegally. while he was already serving that sentence, while he was already in prison, they put him on trial again, this time for sabotage. they convicted him and sentenced him to life on robin island. he began a new sentence that was a life sentence. and for the first 18 years of it, his cell had no bed, no plumbing of ne kind. he was permitted one visitor per year for 30 minutes. he became a symbol, worldwide, of the fight to stop apartheid. the south african government would not allow a picture of him to be taken in prison for decades. so the image was always him when he had been locked away. he served 27
CNN
Dec 7, 2013 1:00am PST
and by the anc, the african national congress, his party, during his long 27 years in prison and castro did and mandela never forget it. >> reporter: in 1964, mandela and other anc leaders faced the death penalty accused of trying to over throw the government by force. >> we believed that the death sentence was going to be passed on some of us, and that is how we should be mortals and disappear under a cloud of glory. >> reporter: mandela, the revolutionary found common purpose with socialist, communist and other revolutionary leaders like gaddafi. >> cuba, iran, all my friends and i propose to honor that friendship. i welcome the friendship with the united states of america and other powers. >> reporter: the united states put mandela on the terror watch list. it wasn't until 2008 that president george w. bush removed him from it. what did mandela think of being called a terrorist? >> i tell other people who say those struggling for operation as a terrorist, i tell them that i was also a terrorist yesterday, but today i'm admired by the very people who said i was one. >>> robin joins me aga
Al Jazeera America
Dec 7, 2013 4:00pm EST
, disguised as a gardener. members. a.n.c. gathered here and the armed wing as well. nelson mandela met with them, they discussed the revolution and what country they wanted to have in the future. nelson mandela was away from the farm when it was raided by police. a large number of a.n.c. leaders were arrested and put into prison. nelson mandela was arrested on his way back to the form, the beginning of a long gaol sentence. he was accused in the robinia trial. the words that he spoke from the dock resonate on this particular day. he said, "i have stood against white domination. i have stood against black domination and cherish the ideal of a democratic society in which people live in harmony and equal opportunity." it's words that people celebrating the death of nelson mandela are cherishing. >> nelson mandela's home in sow is a central point for mourners. nick, i know it's late. what is the crowd like? is it growing? >> yes, it's huge here in soweto. there's about 1,000 people within a few hundred feet of me. there's restaurants to my left. it's a celebration of nelson mandela's life
Al Jazeera America
Dec 7, 2013 8:00pm EST
. helping the u.s. do the right thing around apartheid. others felled no, nelson mandela is with the a.n.c., it was a terrorist organization so a.n.c. should not support. we saw on the ground an opportunity, an opportunity to make sure the u.s. embodied the best of its values as it related to south africa, making sure it did not support apartheid. >> talk about how nelson mandela influenced foreign state policy. >> an interesting thing is nelson mandela did not abandon friends. there's something i know, clinton talked about, he disagreed with nelson mandela on the issue of cuba and his relationship with fidel castro. nelson mandela did not forget his friends. they stood with him. making sure countries in africa could stand together and do what was in the best interests of their people, may not necessarily benefit all. all people around the planet knew that it is possible, that you can make the impossible possible. and that is what happened, and that is, to me, what his life embodied. >> that is why the world is remembering nelson mandela. >> thank you for your time today. >> thank you. >>
FOX
Dec 5, 2013 5:00pm PST
police opened fire on black protesters. 69 people, including 10 children were dead. it pushed the anc to armed struggle. >> i feel that it is useless for us to continue talking peace and non-violence against a government -- >> the anc was outlawed and in 1964 nelson mandela was sentenced to life in prison, convicted of attempting to over throw the government. he became a symbol of resistance. after 27 years he was released in 1990. and emerged as the face of the anti-apartheid movement. four months later he appeared before a standing room only crowd at the oakland coliseum. >> it is you, the people of oakland, the people of the bay area who have given me and my delegation strength and hope. >> free man nelson mandela stepped into negotiations to bring democracy to south africa. in 1993 honored with the noble peace prize. a year later nelson mandela became south africa's first black president. >> never, and never again should it be that this beautiful land will again experience the oppression of one by another. let freedom ring. >> nelson former south african president nelson mandela
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2013 6:00pm EST
of negotiation, not always with the support of his colleagues in the anc, in order to deliver not just a transfer of power that offered the prospect of peace for all the people of south africa. mandela once notably said, "this is not about moving from white domination to black domination. there must be no domination of either community." he was an extraordinary man in not only believing that but practising it with every fibre of his being. as we look today at the lessons of mandela's extraordinary life and incredible achievements, at his contribution not just to south africa, which goes without saying, but to the wider world and at why he has become such an iconic figure, two factors stand out. first, he is perhaps the best example we have had in the past 100 years of how political leaders, by force of personality, transform themselves from politicians into statesman can by their sheer personal effort change the world and make what was impossible possible and then deliver it. he is not the only one who has done so. we should not think of him as unique. gorbachev, by the force of his personality,
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2013 8:45am EST
of the guerrilla army, the formation, the armed wing of the anc and the chief of intelligence. slate got this succession of people from different parts of the liberation movement taking over who had been out of the country for longer to time, or had been imprisoned for laundries of time. and to a certain extent that shape some of the mistakes that have been made in the last yea years. >> does thabo mbeki talk but what surprised we came back after all those years and except? >> want to thank you quickly learn when you interview people or politicians and political power is nothing ever surprise them. so the main thing that upset him every time i was into being and is, i would ask that question what would surprise you to what was unusual, what jumped out at you? every, i would say that he would lean back, take a look at me with a lizardlike look when you know you have irritated him. and that would come. know, my brother, never surprised. never admit you were surprised. i think the things that surprised thabo mbeki certainly who was the second president of the liberated south africa was exte
Al Jazeera America
Dec 7, 2013 6:00pm EST
movement, that we do the right thing around apartheid. mandela, he's with the a.n.c., and some considered that to be a terrorist organization. we had solidarity with people on the ground. we saw an opportunity to make sure that the u.s. embodied the best of its values as it related to africa and that was to make sure that we did not continue to support apartheid. >> tell us about his influence on the united states policy. >> he did not abandon friends. for example, something that i know president clinton has talked about, he always disagreed with president mandela on the issue of cuba and on his relationship with fidel castro. president mandela was not one to forget his friends. he also had such an impact on the african union and creation of the african union, making sure the countries in africa could stand together and do what was in the best interest of their people. sometimes that would not be necessarily what was in the best interest of our countries. he really works to make sure that it wasn't just the people of south africa has benefited from the struggle but that all people around
MSNBC
Dec 7, 2013 11:00am PST
that in time. but as you note, many regimes, many governments saw him and the anc as terrorists and responded accordingly. >> one of the things that's always struck me about nelson mandela's life was here was a guy who could have had the ultimate chip on his shoulder. and not once did you ever see or hear or read about public bitterne bitterness. nelson mandela never displayed any sort of public bitterness. >> i think nelson mandela, consistent with martin luther king and gandhi and others, i think recognized when he emerged from that prison cell that if he were going to lead south africa, he needed a message not only of reconciliation but of a multiracial south africa. and he did a great job in presenting that message. and i think he surprised people that when he emerged from 27 years of imprisonment, i don't think anyone can imagine what it would be like to spend that much time in a narrow jail cell, to be cut off and then to come back and be so lucid, so politically astute, so politically aware and really emerge as one of the great leaders of our times. >> donald, when we talk about mandel
FOX Business
Dec 5, 2013 1:00pm EST
a year to be members of the anc's customer loyalty program. they get at $10 discount after every $100 ticket purchases but now anc promises, quote, a chance to own a piece of the action at the same price as wall street investors, taking $2,500 of new stocks with no fees, the same terms to amc employees, hoping to raise $400 million in total, riegle is the nation's largest theater chain up 20% in the past 12 months but the customer loyalty program and to spin, studies show canceled on to a stock longer than regular investors. rather than sell and bailout true fans can buy more of it after a dip. tracy: my mom has one of those. dennis: this will be an interesting plan for moviegoers to buy stock they never would have heard about. ashley: this might follow suit. dennis: will free might be on that. ashley: as marijuana is legalized in some states one man is hoping to smoke industry competition in an attempt to establish what he calls the anheuser-busch of marijuana. justin hard field is investing in everything from retail stores, emerald green capital, sees a lot of green on the marijuana
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 3:00pm PST
here as well that there was an expose about groups founded specifically to undermine the anc and to try to boost the image of south africa here in the west. so in terms of history when they -- you've got bill o'reilly saying he was a communist. >> last night. let me show that. about nelson mandela on fox. nelson mandela, i spent some time in south africa. he was a communist, this man. he was a communist. all right? >> don't you wonder where it was in south africa? it wasn't like he was hanging out in soweto, that bill o'reilly. i'm quite certain. and of course he doesn't understand the complexity of what the communist party in south africa was at the time. they had a short-term similar goal. >> well, let me show you what the head of the republican party rush limbaugh had to say. or let me let you hear it. >> nelson mandela has more in common or had more in common with clarence thomas than he does with barack obama. mandela had much more in common with clarence thomas. and a lot of conservatives. >> i'm not too good on limbaugh lingo, so could you interpret? >> remember this is the same
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 3:00am PST
'm a loyal member of the anc. the world had changed and had to go away from the socialist philosophy. he changed radically in a very short amount of time. one of the things he always said to me, he was never high bound about haenging his mind. he said when circumstances change i changed my mind. what do you do. another great lesson for politicians. so he evolved so tremendously when he came out of prison. it was astonishing to watch. >> it is astonishing. incredible story. >> the transition between icon to being in power is one of those impossible things to do. >> it was much more difficult coming out of prison and being a practical politician than being in prison. mandela's greatest teacher said i haven't had a good night's sleep since i left prison because now have responsibility. >> in 1994 brian williams interviewed nelson mandela. he asked him about his predecessor f.w. de klerk. >> my relationship with mr. de klerk and he's one of those south africans that i hold in high regard. we have had differences where we said cruel things to each other but at the end of the day, we're able t
CNN
Dec 7, 2013 3:00am PST
what was then known as a terrorist organize. the anc had been fanned anyway. people like fidel castro in cuba supported mandela. >> when he came out of prison, he spoke very loudly about my friend fidel castro. >> he's been condemned in certain countries for the so-called terrorism. >> here's the video. they embraced. >> mandela then made a plea to clinton in 1996 he said let us lift the sanctions that the u.s. has imposed against cuba. here is what clinton had to say. >> sometimes, he could be very serious and say i just don't understand why you don't lift the embargo. and i said, well, i think we were about to do it before they shot down those planes illegally in the brothers to the rescue tragedy. and then congress removed the right to lift the embargo. and sometimes, had was just joking about it but underneath all of that, there was mandela's fierce loyalty to anybody who had stuck by him personally and by the anc, the african national congress, his party, during his long 27 years in prison. and castro did. and mandela never forgot it. >> a fiercely loyal man. he embraced yasser a
CNBC
Dec 5, 2013 7:00pm EST
-communist and he never lost that. there were parts of his coalition, the anc, that were pro-communist. correct me if i'm wrong, but mandela always down through the years, when he got his freedom, when he took office and afterwards, was a firm anti-communist. >> well, he was -- i don't know fully whether he was a firm anti-communist in the sense of what you call soviet communism, but he was firm in that he did not want to give the impression that he was going to turn black nationalism into black racial discrimination against whites. >> i think that really is the point, mr. johnson. he was first and foremost an african nationalist. there were communists who wanted to coopt, if you will, the movement there and he once famously went onstage at a rally of i believe the african national congress and tore up the posters of the communists who had tried to sort of commandeer the movement over there. larry, a moment ago used the word forgiveness. there was a divineness about this man's spirit, wasn't there? >> i think you would have to say if anybody would ever dare say that someone carried a christ-like m
CNN
Dec 9, 2013 9:00am PST
assistance to the anc in times of trouble, he felt loyal. he was very loyal to his friends. he would show the friendship back. what you are going to see is a mismatch of people. hemowho are celebrities, naomi campbell known for her temper and being a hot headed model sitting next to perhaps the head of iran. you know? there's a wonderful image when you can see about tomorrow. i think that is mandela as his p.a. said today, he's bringing people toothing in death as well as he did in life. >> we're looking at pictures of mandela dancing. he was somebody who celebrated life, as well, bringing so many people together. you just can't help but. >> i will and be inspired when you see these images. thank you. appreciate that. the image of bill clinton at robben island, what an amazing treat to see that up close. >> you've got world leaders going there, including he was very critical of george w. bush over the iraq war and bush is heading down there. he was critical of the united states way back in 2003. i think he said if there's a krntd has committed unspeakable an frosties, it is the united sta
NBC
Dec 9, 2013 6:00am PST
and dancing in the streets. sort of an impromptu celebration. yesterday we saw a big anc rally. looks like they are setting up the stage for another. people here very sorrowful about nelson mandela but also very happy to celebrate what he did here in his life. >> this morning roads are still open around soccer city, the stadium where thousands are expected for tomorrow's public memorial. the government says 53 dignitaries have confirmed so far including president and mrs. obama, he is expected to speak, presidents bush, clinton and carter, ban ki-moon, south korea's prime minister, and canada's prime minister. nelson mandela was made an honorary canadian citizen years after his imprisonment on robben island. >> he was on robben island. he was not happy to be there but made the best of it. >> reporter: people continue to bring flowers and mementos to the gate and now we're getting more insight on his final hours inside. a friend who saw mandela two hours before he died says he was sleeping peacefully, not on life support but clearly near the end. >> when i arrived i was taken to his bedroom
PBS
Dec 6, 2013 3:00pm PST
been a lot of talk about the white and black violence there was a tremendous violence between the anc and cata rival movement, lack of social trust. so you could have drawn a very negative scenario for south of ca. in fact, i ronuously did so in some of my reporting down there because i just felt bad social fabric. and it's very hard for leaders to counterago that. >> woodruff: even after he was released. >> right, i was involved in riot, people getting killed. it was ugly. and yet i think by force of moral example h thises with one of those rare case when somebody at the top of society really has a cultural effect. and leads, really averts what could have been quite a disaster. and the country did much, much better in the ensuing years. i think because sheer moral example. >> woodruff: mark, what about you? what do you think of when you think of him? >> well,-- some leaders are respected, and few leaders are loved. nelson mandela is that unique figure who is both loved and respected, virtually around the globe. it's a remarkable achievement. and what i think of is he described resent
CNN
Dec 9, 2013 3:00am PST
about 8%. let all two to the lobby, shall we, and get ourselves some stock? anc theater gearing up to go public. most loyal customers buying shares. members of anc sub rewards program, they offered the same price as bank and wall street zugs institutions according to jerry lopez, so everybody getting in on the action. >> the only thing i care about is what this means for ticket prices. i am saying it is expensive to go to the movies. >> i don't think you will see prices go up. i think they are sharing the love. >> sharing the love, is that what they're doing? >> exactly. thanks, allison. coming up next on "new day," budget de ja vu. four days and counting until congress can get its act together this time around. accidence of u.s. leaders convergeing on south africa, paying tribute to nelson mandela. chris cuomo is there live. he is speaking which someone who knew mandela well. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. to help secure retirements and protect financial futures. to help communities recover and
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2013 4:00pm EST
he called all the anc prisoners together, saying, yes, they would be justified in acts of revenge, retaliation and retribution, but that there could never then be a strong, successful multiracial society, and that was his second great achievement -- to achieve change through reconciliation. but there was also a third achievement -- in refusing to rest or relax when he gave up the presidency, he had a third great, historic, far less acknowledged, achievement to his name. he wrote that in the first part of his life he had climbed one great mountain, to end apartheid, but now in his later life he wanted to climb another great mountain -- to rid the world of poverty, and especially the outrage of child poverty. i need speak only of what i saw in the times that i worked with him -- how quietly and without fanfare he went about his work. in 2005 i flew to south africa to meet nelson mandela to persuade him to come to london so that he could then persuade the finance ministers of the need for debt relief to relieve poverty, and this he did. then in 2006, he and his wife graÇa machel --
CNN
Dec 7, 2013 8:00am PST
in that kitchen was nelson mandela. >> yes, it was actually the night of the -- when they won, when the anc won, my mom went to a party in south africa, and he pulled her up on the stage, and you can see them dancing. great picture. >> very nice. martin luther king iii, thank you so much. appreciate your reflection. safe journey as you contemplate your journey to say your final good-byes to nelson mandela. >>> we'll talk about the latest job numbers. very encouraging in many circles. good news say some with more people going back to work, but is it the temporary fix, or are we seeing the end of a great recession? i'll ask former labor secretary robert reich. he joins us next in the "newsroom." thanks for giving me your smile. thanks for inspiring me. thanks for showing me my potential. for teaching me not to take life so seriously. thanks for loving me and being my best friend. don't forget to thank those who helped you take charge of your future and got you where you are today. the boss of your life. the chief life officer. ♪ are still high in acidic content. if your enamel is exposed to aci
Al Jazeera America
Dec 9, 2013 6:00am EST
and hope. >> the a.n.c. has struggled to fill full nelson mandela's vision. the system is crippled, school buildings falling apart and they have crowding. >> cape town is typical of the struggle. >> i wants to be a doctor. >> he wants to be an information technology. >> there is now a dangerous gap between the promise of education and what it actually delivers. schools boast a 70% pass rate, but to graduate, students only need 30% on their exams, a third of them won't be literate by the time they leave. >> in the end of the 12 years study, about 60% of those young people have fallen out of the system, so it also has to do with the curriculum. it has to do with the kind of training that our teachers had. >> schools are still struggling with the legend of apartheid. this generation is bearing the scars of the system much longer than nelson mandela imagined. >> the world economic forum of switzerland ranked south africa 146 out of one fought eight countries in education, ranking last in mathematics and science. >> officials in singapore are cleaning up after a riot. crowds attacked police and
FOX News
Dec 6, 2013 8:00am PST
wanted to negotiate with him and then on the anc side there were extreme blacks who wanted can carry on the armed struggle and moderate blacks. his party was driven with factions as well and it was only his own, what i think was the difference between the way south africa went and the way other countries went was his own personal leadership skills. jon: yeah and amazing that he developed those skills in the way he did because most politicians kind of learn a little bit at time on the job, you know, from dinners to elections to higher and higher offices. he spent much of his adult life in prison and yet when emerged from prison he was not a bitter, vengeful man. what can you tell us about his thoughts on that? >> right. he spent years, 23 hours out of 24, staring at a blank wall. what kind of training does that give you? he was 71 when he came out of prison. most people, that, spending that long in prison would probably want to go and retire. so, and i think, perhaps one of the things that he learned at that time when he had all those hours to think was that he managed, even though he
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